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In Parshat Tzav we learn about a fire that never went out. "Aysh Tamid Tukad Al Hamizbayach Lo Tichbeh" - "A permanent fire shall remain aflame on the altar it shall not be extinguished," Vayikra 6:6 . The word "Tamid" (permanent) is interesting because we find the same word used with reference to the Korban (sacrifice) Tamid which was offered only twice each day. How can twice daily be considered "Tamid" or eternal, like the flame on the altar or the Eternal light in our Synagogue? 
Rabbi Salanter answers that for something to be permanent it need not necessarily be continuous 24 hours a day; twice a day is sufficient to be considered "Tamid." Tamid doesn't mean all day, it means every day. 
So it is with our Torah study. Ideally, we should consider Torah our full time occupation, and the job we go to each morning, our part time job. However, most of us need to work in order to support our families. How then can we make Torah study a permanent flame that never goes out? In Pirkei Avot, 1:15 Shammai teaches that we should make our Torah study a regular permanent practice. By setting aside a specific morning and evening session every day, our Torah study becomes "Tamid," and the flame burns brightly all the time. 

The Shabbat before Pesach is called Shabbat Hagadol - The Great Shabbat. On this Shabbat B'nai Yisroel demonstrated their great faith in Hashem. It was on this day, in Egypt that B'nai Yisroel took sheep, an Egyptian deity, and told their captors that they intended to sacrifice those sheep as Moshe instructed them. This act took great courage and faith in Hashem and they were rewarded with divine protection. When you put faith in Hashem ahead of your fears, Hashem responds. 
Kol Tov!  Our best to's all good.
Shabbat Shalom, CM
As we know, our primary Mitzvah is to learn Torah. With all the demands of modern living, when do you find time to study Torah? 


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